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prajnaparamita-devi-br

She is the perfect wisdom that never comes into being
And therefore never goes out of being.
She is known as the Great Mother…
She is the Perfect Wisdom who gives birthless birth to all Buddhas.
And through these sublimely Awakened Ones,
It is Mother Prajnaparamita alone
Who runs the wheel of true teaching.

In the foundational body of Mahayana Literature known as the Prajnaparamita or Perfection of Wisdom texts, the highest metaphysical principle – the energy, glory, and radiance of enlightened wisdom – is envisioned as a cosmic female, the mother of knowledge, the source of all Buddhas. This goddess, known as Prajnaparamita is regarded  as the mother of all all beings who attain enlightenment, for it is her wisdom that engenders liberation. She is the supreme teacher and eternal font of revelation. All who seek illumination must sit at her feet and drink from the stream of teachings that flow from her presence. Thus, Prajnaparamita is the ultimate source of refuge and object of reverence, for only those who prize wisdom above all else may attain it. Even Buddhas and bodhisattvas pay homage to her, because to her they owe their omniscience. To worship a Buddha, the relics of a Buddha, or a stupa is to honor what she has brought into being, to revere her is to directly worship the source.

“Just as philosophy is the queen of sciences, Prajnaparamita is the philosophiae regina, the Buddhist Sophia, a dazzling figure who represents the transcendent wisdom that crowns the intellectual and spiritual quest.”

In the wake of the contending schools of Abhidharma philosophy, mother Prajnaparamita arose to cast her serene, clear-sighted gaze of nondual wisdom over all disputants. Her luminous golden persona draws her devotees away from worldly attachments and into the encompassing splendor of her mystical mother light.

Origins

Prajnaparamita shares her name with the literature in which she appears, the philosophy which she is associated, and the knowledge she personifies. The text that introduces both the philosophy and the goddess “Prajnaparamita Sutra” took shape during the first two centuries of the common era. It is worth noting here the rumors circulating in and around China of ascetics displaying supernatural faculties in Tibet around this time.

Year 110 ce“Having become more aware of the world beyond China, the Chinese are hearing rumors about places of godliness and paradise where the climate is mild, where people are without sickness or disease and where people govern themselves. One such paradise is thought to be in the mountains of Tibet. There, it is said, waters give one immortality, one can climb a mountain peak and become a spirit with the power to control the wind and rain, or one can climb another nearby peak and ascend to heaven.”

The central importance and cosmic status of the wisdom mother at her earliest appearance are surprising given the apparent swiftness with which she rose on the Mahayana horizon. Nothing in the female figures who preceded her would foreshadow such a development. Her female forebears were divinities associated with nature and its fecundating powers, such as tree spirits (yaksini), Bhudevi, and Laksmi. There is little in these goddesses of earthly provenance, however benevolent and auspicious they might be, to foretell the radiant entity of pure spirit and wisdom that is Prajnaparamita. The goddess, like the philosophy with which she is associated appears to represent a revolutionary shift in Buddhist consciousness.

Although Prajnaparamita, like her namesake wisdom, is said to transcend all categories, she has the trait of gender, a femaleness is central to her character. There are deep metaphorical resonances between motherhood and the matrix of wisdom and reality she represents. If gender is to be assigned to a generative principle, the feminine gender is a logical choice, for the womb is the most tangible source of generation in human experience. Just as male bodies derive biologically from female ones, it stands to follow in the religious sphere that male Buddhas would have a female source. Thus, the femaleness of Prajnaparamita carries the force of logic and observation.

Mother of All Buddhas

One of the main titles and roles of Prajnaparamita is that of “Mother of All Buddhas”. This theme, one of the guiding principles of the sutra’s text, is introduced in an opening verse:

The Buddhas in the world-systems in the ten directions
Bring to mind this Perfection of Wisdom as their mother.
The saviors of the world who were in the past,
And also those that are now in the ten directions,
Have issued from her, and so will the future ones be.
She is the one who reveals reality,
She is the genetrix, the mother of the victorious ones.

The work restates in numerous ways that Prajnaparamita is the begetter of all Buddhas because she is the source of the omniscience that qualifies them as Buddhas, or Tathagatas, “those who have gone to reality”: The All-knowledge of the Tathagatas has come forth from her… it is in this sense that The Perfection of Wisdom generates Tathagatas.

As the wisdom that makes possible the attainment of Buddhahood, Prajnaparamita is an enduring reality, whereas her children, are ephemeral and illusory. Prajnaparamita, Mother of the Buddhas, is the… sole reality. The emanation bodies of Buddhas and bodhisattvas appear and disappear, whereas the wisdom light of Mother Prajnaparamita is always shining. Buddhas cannot bring themselves into being but “owe their existence” to her. Thus, this philosophy accords primacy to the source – the metaphorical birthgiver – rather than to its fruits, extending the reassurance that even if a given Buddha and his teachings pass away, the mother abides and will birth more illumined children.

The text develops the metaphor of motherhood at length. Just as mothers extend comfort and safety to their children, Prajnaparamita is the shelter, defense, and protection of the seeker of wisdom. Just as parents guide their children in morality; she is the source of all virtues, or perfections of character. She nurtures her progeny by providing the knowledge they require to fulfill their highest destiny, namely to understand the nature of reality and dedicate themselves to the welfare and liberation of all beings. Children naturally adore such a mother, seek to protect her from harm, and strive to bring her happiness:

“They would therefore look after her, give her everything that could make her happy, protect her well, make much of her… in just this same way… fond are the Tathagatas of this Perfection of Wisdom, so much do they cherish and protect it. For she is their mother and begetter, she showed them this all-knowledge, she instructed them in the ways of the world.”

It is incumbent on the offspring of such a mother not only to honor and cherish her but to remember and transmit what she has taught them.

Prajnaparamita’s motherhood devolves upon her role as the source of the wisdom that generates Buddhas. Therefore, she is celebrated as the ultimate teacher – the beacon, torch, and instructor of those who seek  liberating insight. She reveals the world as it is, the end goal of all religious instruction. Thus she is the teacher of teachers, the guide of the Buddhas and bodhisattvas as they lead others. She is the ‘inexhaustible storehouse’ of truth that is given voice by all Buddhas of the past, present, and future. When Buddhas teach, Prajnaparamita is the source and content of their teachings. As the fount of all truth, it is she who sets in motion the wheel of Dharma.

Thus a Buddha may teach for the duration of a single lifetime, or even in myriad worlds and aeons, but the teachings of mother Prajnaparamita flow for all eternity. Because she is eternal, the Buddhas and bodhisattvas will always have guidance and assistance. This is why, even in the absence of a human teacher, or in a world or era not graced by the presence of Buddhism, a questing spirit may discover the truth and reveal the path to freedom anew.

References: Buddhist Goddesses of India – Miranda Shaw

Panacea-devi-br

She dwells on a forest glade high on a mountainside. Her beauty reflects the lure of the forest. Her skin glistens with emerald light; the healing sap of trees flows in her veins; her limbs are robust and supple as saplings. She adorns herself with natures finery: feathers, flowers, fruit, and berries. She is necklaced by a white snake, crowned with flowers, and has small snakes as hair ribbons. She wields a small axe. She brandishes a bow and arrow. She is a huntress and her aim is true. She wears a skirt made of leaves that sways around her hips as she dances in her primeval bower.

Thus arrayed in tribal splendor, she wanders in a state of joyous, primal rapture, alive to the colors, fragrances, and textures of the forest. Her woodland home is a treasure trove of botanical riches and medicinal secrets. Tutored in the unwritten lore of the forest, she is mistress of the healing mysteries, a goddess with the power to cure the most drastic illnesses and epidemics. Panacea (Parnasavari) embodies the close relationship with nature that must be maintained if the healing arts are to flourish. Even when Panacea is evoked in ritual, the environment created for her is not the standard jeweled mansion of a deity but a gem laden mountain dense with groves of magical trees and carpeted with flowers of every hue. Thus the goddess need not leave her verdant wildwood paradise to manifest at the ritual.

Parnasavari personifies the magical healing properties of nature that can be tapped through dance, trance, and incantation. Because her curative powers are channeled through meditation, ritual, and mantra, the objects that she bears also serve a ritual purpose. Her implements also serve in the ritual capture and binding of diseases. Diseases are not only bodily conditions, but can be entities – invisible to the eye but none the less tangible – that can be banished or destroyed. When Parnasavari is ritually invoked to perform this function, she uses her vajra-tipped noose to lasso the disease demons. She clasps the noose with a threatening hand gesture, signaling the imminent entrapment of harmful spirits. After she has extracted the disease demons, she uses her axe to chop them, or her bow to pierce their hearts, rendering them impotent.

vajra-scepterThe ritual dimension of Parnasavari is most directly indicated by the vajra (bronze scepter; translates: thunderbolt and diamond) she bears. The vajra symbolizes her indestructibility as well as her adamantine insight into the illusory nature of all phenomena. A healer, to be effective, must have the wisdom to recognize ultimate insubstantiality of a disease if she or he is to envision its absence and accomplish its removal. Moreover, in tantric ritual a vajra is flourished with sacred hand gestures to channel energy. Thus, the vajra conveys that the healer works with the patients energy. The physical symptoms are understood as a tangible manifestation of a negative energy embedded in the patient’s psyche or a disturbance of the patients energies due to toxic substances, harmful psychological forces, or malevolent supernatural agency. A healer must discern the nature of a disease as a blockage in the energy flow and intervene to restore a balanced, healthy pattern. The vajra, as a tool for directing energy, addresses this metaphysical level of healing work. The scepter strikes through the physical manifestation to the core of the problem.

Parnashavari-statue3Parnasavari is the picture of robust vitality. She is said to be youthful, vibrant, and muscular, with a plump firm body, a sign of good health reflecting her capacity to trample disease demons. Devotees of Parnasavari can gain access to her healing powers in several ways. All of these techniques begin with a vivid mental image of the goddess. The meditator absorbs the image and then works with her divine healing energies in a state of unity with her. One method is to transmit colored light from the meditators body to the patient, or whole towns or areas that are threatened by contagious diseases or epidemics. The healing ray colors are frequencies and can be forest green, radiant red, marine blue, golden sun, soft white, or the violet purple ray of shakti.

Another method is to make amulets that are imbued with her presence by dharani recitation. Such an amulet is worn to protect the wearer against infectious diseases and other misfortunes. A healing practitioner may compound medicinal pellets from powdered herbs, foods, and gemstones according to her texts. Here the healer envisions her image dissolving into the pills, and further vivifies them with mantra recitations.

Although the process of healing associated with Parnasavari involves physical substances and ritual acts, it is ultimately seen as a process of spiritual purification. The inner dimension of healing operates on the most subtle levels of a persons being, eliminating the underlying causes of illness by clearing blockages in the normal flow of energy and infusing the recipient’s spirit with sufficient radiance and resilience to prevent a recurrence of the disease.

There is an ancient Tibetan healing meditation that operates on this subtle level. The healer focuses on five energy centers in the yogic anatomy of his or her body. These five chakra centers are located at the crown of the head, throat, heart, naval, and root (pelvis). The healer creates a mental image of Parnasavari in each chakra: a white goddess at the crown, red at the throat, blue at the heart, yellow at the navel, and green at the pelvis. These small figures emit streams of light that the healer transmits to the corresponding bodily sites in the patient. The patient consciously absorbs the energy and visualizes it flooding the energy centers, removing energy blockages and regenerating the body at the etheric level.

A person who is sufficiently self-aware can prolong the benefits by refraining from pathogenic patterns of thought and emotion in the future. This technique is most effective for those who can use there own proficiency in meditation to complete the process by establishing three protective shields of light around the body.  The outer layer is formed from white light generated from the crown of the head, the next from red light emanated from the throat, and the innermost  from blue light radiated from the heart. These protective barriers consist of many images of Parnasavari densly packed together. Her luminous effigies protect the body, speech, and mind of the meditator and stand guard against any negative energies or contagions that arise in the future.

Pacifier of all intense pain,
Destroyer of all sickness.
Mistress of all well-being,
You deserve universal honor.
As long as there is suffering,
do not abandon the world!


References: Buddhist Goddesses of India – Miranda Shaw

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440KWP – Panacea, Rank Five, Position Fourteen, Snaketamer:  aka Vudasi, Sachamama (amazonian), Parnashavari (Tibetan), Hygeia (greek) –Assigned to medic division, psychedelic healing, eugenics, quest for the solution to all ills. Targets big pharma, vaccination programs, weaponized medicine, and the medical cartel. Uniquely commands the power of the janus faced serpent and confers it on others.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: _____ in the SNAKETAMER

Sachamama means Mother Tree [or Mother Jungle]. She was a goddess in the shape of a snake with two heads. When she passed on to the heavenly world she transformed into K’uychi. Literally, spirit mother of the jungle.

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Mahavidya-Matangi-br

She has a smiling face, her eyes are intoxicated, and she is seated on a corpse. She is blue in color and has the disc of the moon on her forehead. She has a very thin waist, her breasts are round and firm, and she holds a noose, a sword, a goad, and a club in her four hands.

Matangi is erotically powerful. Her name literally means “she whose limbs are intoxicated with passion.”  In one version of Matangi’s origin story there is clear emphasis of sexual tension between husband and wife, where Parvati asks Siva for permission to return to her paternal home and Siva’s reluctance to grant it. Siva, in disguise, seeks to test and seduce his own wife, while she in turn does the same thing to him. They present themselves as ‘the forbidden’, and perhaps inadvertently make themselves more sexually appealing to each other. Parvati agrees to have sex with the merchant in disguise and Siva lusts after the Candala huntress from the jungle (Matangi). One of the central tensions in the story is the lure and attractiveness of illicit sex – seen as spiritually transformative, as Siva is actually transformed into a Candala (low caste) during the sex act.

Matangi is closely identified with a goddess named Savaresvari, Mistress of the Savaras, from a legendary forest tribe. Savaresvari is described as sixteen and short in stature. She is entirely clothed in leaves, she holds a basket of vines, is collecting fruit with her right hand, and is smiling and singing. This goddess puts into sharp focus another aspect of Matangi, her association with the forest. In Matangi’s 1000 name hymn she is called She Who Lives in the Forest. Who Walks in the Forest, Who knows the Forest. She is also said to control all wild animals. This further reinforces her role as an outcast, living in a forest culture, in a life beyond the boundaries of civilized society.

Matangi’s association with low castes and pollution is clear in the ways in which polluted substances are handled among certain communities in Nepal. The lowest group of castes in Napal, the Pore, includes sweepers, cleaners of latrines, and fishermen. These castes have the important job of collecting and accumulating the polluted and polluting detritus of other castes and getting rid of it. They not only collect physically impure things, such as human waste, but are also thought to accumulate pollution associated with death and bad luck. They are required to live outside the village and in this sense define the boundaries of ‘pure’ society. That society cannot, in fact, function without them: they provide the valve through which it rids itself of its own pollution. This role of low castes is is a common theme in Hindu idea of caste and pollution. These castes are also known by the caste name Matangi.

In the Nepalese context, polluted substances and items are also associated with special rocks called chwasas that are set up at crossroads  a common location for getting rid of dangerous things). Remains of sacrificial heads offered to deities, clothes worn by people just before they died, and other such things are disposed of at chwasas. The deity associated with these crossroads ‘is the dangerous goddess Matangi’, who is believed to consume these dangerous materials. Like the untouchables among whom she is found, that is, she gets rid of pollution by accepting it as an offering and in so doing lives up to her name Uccista-Matangi.

The Goddess of Magical Powers

Like other goddesses among the Mahavidyas, particularly Idris the Paralyzer, Matangi is worshiped in order to gain certain magical or psychic powers, specifically control over others. In one prayer, the Mahavidyas are typified according to their peculiar natures and powers. The aspirant asks to be like Chinnamasta in showing generosity to others, like Idris in battle, like Dhumavati when angry, in kingly functions like Shodashi, in times of peace like Bhudevi, and in controlling enemies like Matangi. In worshiping Matangi one gains power over others, the power of everything one says becomes true, and the power of attracting people.

Often found in Mahavidya texts, a command is identified and associated with a Mahavidya ‘concerning the acquisition of desires’. It is here that the different ‘recipes’ are given for achieving specific benefits in return for worshiping the goddess in question. Here Matangi is clearly associated with acquiring magical powers and granting favors. It is useful in getting a more complete picture of Mahavidya worship to discuss in some detail this aspect of her cult.

Certain preliminary rites are necessary before making the specific offerings to obtain what one wants. First, and of essential importance is the empowerment of the goddess’s mantra, which will be an indispensable part of subsequent rituals. The devotee empowers the mantra by performing five rituals. The mantra is then empowered and is referred to as a supernatural mantra (siddha mantra).

Next is performed the worship of the place within which the offerings will be made for the desired boons. The place is cleared by banishing inimical spirits, then guardian deities are summoned from all ten directions. Next the goddesses yantra is constructed (either physically or mentally). On this yantra alter the devotee kindles a fire. Depending on the devotees desired wishes, different elements or combinations of elements are offered up in the fire, accompanied by the recitation of Matangi’s mantra. Other factors are specified as to place, times, day or night, for most effective performance of the ritual.

Some ‘recipes’ call for success in yoga, acquiring power to rule over others – kingship, destroying diseases, obtaining great wealth, abundance in the stores of grain, power to paralyze, the power to attract others, the power to vanquish enemies, and the power to acquire poetic talent.


References:

Ten Mahavidyas – Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine – Kinsley

 

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440KWP – Matangi, Rank One, Position Nine, Manitou: aka White Buffalo Woman (Lakota), Erzulie Dantor (Haitian Voudoun) –Assigned to teaching rites of passage (puberty, marriage/mating), trickster arts, exposing and demolishing specious paths of spirituality, especially new age narcissism and escapism. Targeting new age guru, all aspects of cultural marxism. Dedicated to teaching the planetary vision quest and proving its unique value and perspective.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 1/31/17 in the MANITOU (waterbearer)

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Wrathful-Tara-Golden-br

Golden Prassana Tara is Terrible to Behold, blazing like the sun, with a necklace of bloody heads and sixteen arms holding an array of weapons and Tantric attributes. She “emancipates the universe” and ‘destroys the veils of ignorance.’ She Who is Fearsome With Upward Flaming Hair. Tara the War Goddess. Who is Peaceful by Day and Wrathful by Night, the daytime form is the ever popular Green Tara. The nocturnal manifestation is white and corpulent, aggressive in appearance, garbed in a leopard skin vest and snake necklace.

Tara’s Origins in Tibetan Buddhism

Mahavidya_TaraTara occupies a a central place in Tibetan Buddhism and to a great extent plays the role of a Tibetan national deity. In her Buddhist context, she is almost always a benevolent, compassionate, gentle, playful young woman who indulges her devotees and never lets them come to harm.

In her Hindu context, on the other hand, particularly as one of the Mahavidyas, Tara is almost always fierce, often horrible to behold, and potentially dangerous. Although Tara also has fierce aspects in Buddhism and benign ones in Hinduism, she generally manifests gentle features in the former and fierce ones in the latter. Historically it is likely that the Hindu Mahavidya Tara developed from the Buddhist bodhisattva Tara and that the Hindu preference was for her fierce manifestations, i.e. her Wrathful Green Tara, another facet of a complex and creative gallery of manifestations Tara assumes. In fact, the shakti cluster diagram (JLL’s Design) identifies this Wrathful Green Tara aspect as primary, however I am taking liberty to introduce her golden aspect with equal measure, in playful pleasure.

Tara’s importance in Buddhism preceded her inclusion into the Mahavidya Hindu tradition. Tara’s essential nature in Tibetan Buddhism is that of a compassionate savior who rescues her devotees from peril. An interesting aspect of early Tibetan legends is that they associate Tara with the origins of the Tibetan people in a special way. She is in a legendary sense their queen and mother. The Buddhist tradition celebrates motherhood in many ways and through a range of female divinities, but nowhere is motherhood more complete or exalted than in Tara, the ultimate embodiment of mother love.

Despite Tara’s many forms and functions found in early texts, i.e. Homages to the Twenty One Tara’s, it seems clear the roots of her extraordinary power and appeal are that of a Savioress, as a being who specializes in dramatic appearances when her devotees call upon her in dire circumstances. She is often said to rescue her devotees from such desperate predicaments as being lost in an impenetrable forest, foundering in a storm at sea, being under threat of imminent execution, or being trapped and bound in prison. In many folk stories Tara appears at the request of her devotees to snatch them  from the jaws of death. Tara’s compassion for suffering beings, then, is revealed primarily in her role as cheater of death. In this sense her chief blessing to her devotees is a long life.

The Fierce Tara of Hinduism

Historically, it is likely that the Hindu Mahavidya Tara developed from Buddhist bodhisattva Tara and that the Hindu preference was for her fierce manifestations. Indeed she is more like Kali in appearance than any of the other Mahavidyas.

Nearly every description of Tara in Hindu sources stresses her fierce, often horrifying appearances and reminds us of the terrifying Tara Kurukulla of the Buddhist tradition. One Hindu mantra describes her thus:

“I meditate upon the divine Mother of the three worlds, who is sitting on a white lotus situated in the center of the waters enveloping the entire universe. In her left hand she holds a knife and a skull, and in her right hands, a sword and a blue lotus. Her complexion is blue, and she is bedecked with ornaments. She is decorated with three beautiful serpents and has three red eyes. Her tongue is always moving, and her teeth and mouth appear terrible. She is seated on the heart of a corpse near a blazing funeral pyre. Thus should one meditate on Bhugavata Tara, who is the mistress of all three worlds.”

Tara’s description and character in Hindu texts emphasize two important and related features that are absent from the Buddhist Tara: 1) she is strongly associated with the goddess Kali, whom she closely resembles, and 2) she is often located in the cremation ground. Like Kali, in her Hindu context Tara enjoys blood. She Who Likes Blood, She Who is Smeared With Blood, She Who Enjoys Blood Sacrifice. Like Kali, her worship seems to play upon the power of the forbidden and the attempt to transmute forbidden objects or acts into spiritually transformative instruments. And like Kali, Tara’s fierce aspect may be interpreted in positive ways that conform to her role as the liberator.

Although Tara’s appearance and habits initially seem to be almost totally terrifying and fearsome, she has a gentler side. She is a savior who takes special care of her devotees, and in this respect she reflects the personality of the gentle Tara of Tibetan Buddhism. The Hindu Tara’s means of helping her devotees are more abrasive and frightening, but the end result – liberation – is similar. The Hindu Tara tends to shock her devotees into liberating knowledge, while the Tibetan Tara overwhelms them with compassion.

 


References:

Ten Mahavidyas – Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine – Kinsley
Buddhist Goddesses of India – Miranda Shaw

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440KWP – Tara, Rank Five, Position Two, Bull: aka Dolma, the Wrathful Green Tara, Selector – assigned to preserve and teach the Grail legend and the Terma of Gaia Awakening. Targets false and misleading teachings about the Grail and its Guardians. Undertakes the special mission of countering lies about racial identity, eugenics, and multicultural race-mixing.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 4-30-17 in the BULL

 

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Mahavidya-Dhumavati-br

Dhumavati is ugly, unsteady, and angry. She is tall and wears dirty clothes. Her ears are ugly and rough, she has long teeth, and her breasts hang low. She has a long nose. She has the form of an angry widow. Her eyes are fearsome and her hands tremble. She rides in a chariot that has a banner with a crow emblem. In one hand she holds a winnowing basket, and with the other hand she makes a gesture of conferring boons. Her nature is rude. She is always hungry and thirsty and looks unsatisfied.  She likes to create strife, and she is always frightful in appearance.

Dhumavati is barely known outside the Mahavidyas. If she had an independent cult prior to her inclusion in the group, then very little evidence remains. However, Dhumavati bears striking similarities to a few goddesses who appeared in early Hindu traditions. One goddess whom Dhumavati is identified with is named Alaksmi. In one of the early texts praising Sri Laksmi (Mahavidya Kamala), Sri is asked to banish her sister, Alaksmi. Alaksmi is said to appear in such inauspicious forms as need, poverty, hunger, and thirst. Laksmi is her exact opposite, and the two do not dwell in the same place at the same time; by their natures, they are incompatible and are unavailable to exist when the other is present. Alaksmi is described as “an old hag riding an ass. She has a broom in her hand (the Sweeper). A crow adorns her banner.”

While similarities between Dhumavati and her predecessors are unmistakable, there are some important differences. One is that she is a widow. She is also described as fierce, frightening, and fond of blood. She crushes bones in her mouth and the sound is awful. She is said to make the noises of drums and bells, which are frightening and warlike. She wears a garland of skulls, chews the corpses of the demons Canda and Munda, and drinks a mixture of blood and wine. Her eyes are glaring red, stern, and without tenderness. She carries Yama’s buffalo horn in her hand, symbolizing death. She dwells with widows, in ruined houses, and in wild, uncivilized, dangerous places such as deserts.

Dhumavati also has certain important positive characteristics and is interpreted by some as an effective symbol or power for achieving spiritual knowledge and liberation. None of the other preceding goddesses had any positive aspects. Dhumavati, then, stands in a tradition of inauspicious goddesses who symbolize the more difficult and painful aspects of life and reality.

One origin myth says that she was born when Sati burned herself to death on her fathers sacrificial fire or was burned on that fire after she committed suicide by willing her own death. Dhumavati was created from the smoke of Sati’s burning body. She emerged from that fire with blackened face; she appeared from that smoke. Born in such circumstances, embodying both the mood of the insulted, outraged goddess Sati at the time of her death and her funeral smoke, Dhumavati has a sad frame of mind. She is Sati in the form of smoke.

She is said to be the embodiment of the tamas guna, the aspect of creation associated with lust and ignorance. She likes liquor and meat. She is the aspect of reality that is old, ugly, and unappealing. The Mahavidyas are supposed to represent the diversity of reality, so there are females in young and beautiful forms and the ugly and fearsome forms. Dhumavati is generally associated with all that is inauspicious: She dwells in areas of the earth that are perceived to be desolate, such as deserts, in abandoned houses, in quarrels, in mourning children, in hunger and thirst, and particularly in widows.

The inauspicious if not dangerous overtones of Dhumavati as a widow may be better understood in the context of the Nepalese belief in boksis, a class of dangerous, inimical spirit beings who possess widows. To become a boksi it is necessary for a woman to sacrifice her husband or son.  Widows are here associated with the murder of their husbands and sons, with willful evil. They are understood as bringing about there own inauspicious condition by despicable acts or as being vulnerable to possession by evil spirits who will prompt them to undertake such acts. Widows by definition, are suspect as dangerous beings who are likely to cause trouble and who therefore be avoided. As the divine widow, the symbolic widow par excellence, Dhumavati is to be feared.

So it appears that Dhumavati is primarily a being to keep at bay. Indeed, the majority of people are advised not to worship her, and married people, in particular, should keep her at a distance. That anyone would approach her seems, at first glance, highly unlikely.

In several texts, however, it is said that she grants siddhis (paranormal powers) to those who worship her, that she rescues her devotees from all kinds of trouble, and that she grants all rewards and desires, including ultimate knowledge and liberation. It is said that inside she is tenderhearted. Her worshipers, in general, have a feeling of wanting to be alone and have a distaste for worldly things. In this vein, her worship is appropriate for world renouncers. She gives ‘anything the devotee wants’ which is unusual among deities. She is partial to unmarried people, and to those who have been widowed. It is said, only unmarried people could withstand her great power and successfully spend a night in her temple.

In concluding, Dhumavati attracts and probably encourages and reinforces a certain kind of independence, or solitariness, that is experienced outside of marriage. It is important to remember, though, that the highest stages of the spiritual quest can only be undertaken alone, after the aspirant has left home and family.


kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440References:

Ten Mahavidyas – Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine – Kinsley

KWP – Dhumavati, Rank Five, Position Seven, She Roams the Zodiak: aka Our lady of Smoke, the Sweeper, Crow Woman, the Gitana –Assigned to treat emotional damage, grief, separation, and loss within the Party. Targets false therapies of transformation. “Gives grief” to self-declared healers and other charlatans.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting:

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kali-ma-br

She is the terrible one who has a dreadful face. Her hair is disheveled and she wears a garland of freshly cut human heads. Her ear ornaments are the corpses of children. Her fangs are dreadful, and her face is fierce. Her breasts are large and round, and she wears a girdle made of severed human hands. Blood trickles from the corners of her mouth and makes her face gleam. She makes a terrible sound and lives in the cremation ground, where she is surrounded by howling jackals.

Mahakala

Mahakala

Kali is completely naked. Her body gleams with blood that is smeared all over it from the garland of bleeding severed heads around her neck. She has four arms. In her upper left hand she holds a sword that has just been bloodied by the severed head that she holds in her lower left hand. Her upper right hand makes the gesture of assurance and her lower right hand, the sign of granting favors.  She stands on the chest of Siva in the form of a corpse. She is eager to have sexual intercourse in reverse fashion with Mahakala. She has a bluish complexion and is lustrous like a dark cloud. She wears a satisfied expression. Her tongue lolls. She smiles.

Early History of Kali

The earliest references to Kali date to the medieval period (around 600 ce). They usually place her on the periphery of Hindu society or on the battlefield. Original texts (puranas) involve Kali for success in war and victory over one’s enemies. She has an awful appearance: she is gaunt, has fangs, laughs loudly, dances madly, wears a garland of corpses, sits on the back of a ghost, and lives in the cremation ground.

She is asked to crush, trample, break, and burn the enemy. Kali’s association with thieves is also seen in her role as patron deity of the infamous Thugs, who specialized in befriending and then murdering travelers. She is also known to bestow magical powers on thieves to help them in their criminal deeds.

Kali’s association with the periphery of Hindu society (she is worshiped by criminals, tribals, and members of low castes, in uncivilized and wild places) is also evident in architecture work of 6th-8th centuries. Her association with criminals reinforces her dangerous role in society. She is at home outside the moral order and seems to be unrestrained by it.

In terms of her early history, it is evident Kali is primarily a goddess who threatens stability and order. Although she may be said to serve order in her role as slayer of demons, more often than not she becomes so frenzied on the battlefield, intoxicated on the blood of her victims, that she herself begins to destroy the world that she is supposed to protect. Thus, even in the service of gods, she is dangerously and likely to get out of control. In association with other goddesses, she emerges to represent their embodied wrath and fury, a frightening, dangerous dimension of the divine feminine that is released when these goddesses become enraged or are summoned to take part in war and killing.

Kali and Tantrism

Despite Kali’s terrible appearance, gruesome habits, and association with the periphery of civilization in many early references, she eventually achieved great popularity and prominence in the Hindu tradition. She figures prominently in tantric texts in Kashmir. Specifically the philosophy that portrays reality as essentially the interaction of two principles, Siva and Sakti, Kali is often designated as  one of the forms assumed by Sakti. So it is clear that tantric sadhana (spiritual endeavor) featuring Kali was common in Kashmir at an early period. An important image in Kashmir Tantrism is the sakti cakra, described as a wheel of energy symbolizing the evolution and dynamics of consciousness. Sometimes the main wheel  has additional wheels within it, representing different types of consciousness, or phases in the cognitive process, and those wheels are identified with ‘the twelve Kali’s’.

An underlying assumption in tantric ideology is that reality is the result and expression of the symbolic interaction of male and female, Siva and Sakti, the quiescent and the dynamic, and other polar opposites that produce a creative tension. Consequently, goddesses in Tantrism play an important role and are affirmed to be crucial in discerning the nature of ultimate reality. Although Siva is usually said to be the source of the tantras, the source of wisdom and truth, and Parvati, his spouse, to be the student to whom the texts are given, many of the tantras emphasize the fact that it is Sakti (personified as Parvati, Kali, and other goddesses) who is immediately present to the adept and whose presence and being underlie the adept’s own being. For the tantric adept it is her vitality that is sought through various techniques aimed at spiritual transformation; therefore it is she who is affirmed as the dominant and primary reality.

The Primordial Mahavidya

The Mahavidyas have been known as a group – ten goddesses – since the early medieval period (post 10th century). Kali is the primordial Mahavidya. In some cases it seems apparent that the other Mahavidyas originate from Kali or her differing forms. Kali lends to the group as a whole her own characteristics. Her character, attributes, and nature are shared by the others. Kali reveals or symbolizes the ultimate goal suggested or implied in the other ten Mahavidyas. Kali alone among the Mahavidyas, or to the fullest extent (with honorable respect to Shodashi), reveals the nature of ultimate reality and symbolizes fully awakened consciousness.

In several of their origin myths, the Mahavidya’s arise when a goddess (Sati, Parvati, or Kali) exerts her independence from her husband, invariably Siva. In this case the Mahavidyas are symbols of female independence. Kali dramatically illustrates this. She is rarely, if ever, depicted as playing the role of the compliant, subservient wife. She is not characterized by the attributes of a woman totally devoted to her husband, obedient to his wishes and compliant to his will in every way. As Siva’s consort, she violates that stereotype. She dominates him, inciting him to destructive frenzy, standing on his body, or assuming the upper position, the ‘mans position’, in sex.

Kali is sexually powerful. In later texts, she is often said to be eternally young, with full and firm breasts, and a beautiful smiling face. In later tantric texts, she is sexually aggressive and is often shown or described as having sex with Siva. She is called: She Whose Essential Form is Sexual Desire, Whose Form is the Yoni, Who Loves the Lingam, Who dwells in an Ocean of Semen. In this respect, Kali also violates the idea of the controlled woman who is sexually satisfied by marriage. Kali is sexually voracious and dangerous because of this.

Kali denotes freedom, particularly freedom from social norms. She dwells outside the confines of normal society. She prefers the cremation ground, which is a place avoided by those who live within society. She lives in the forests or the jungle, among uncivilized people. Her loose hair and nudity suggest that she is totally unrestrained, totally free from social and ethical roles and expectations. She is worshiped by criminals and outcastes. She is unrefined, raw in appearance and habit. And she is powerful, full of energy, perhaps because of being an outsider, a breaker of boundaries and social models.

Kali’s four arms represent the complete circle of creation and destruction which is contained within or encompassed by her. She represents the inherent creative and destructive rhythms of the cosmos. Her right hands, making the mudras of ‘fear not’ and conferring boons, represent the creative aspect of Kali, while the left hands, holding a bloodied sword and a severed head, represent her destructive aspect. Her three eyes represent the sun, moon, and fire., with which she is able to observe the three modes of time: past, present, and future.

The bloodied sword and severed head also symbolize the destruction of ignorance and dawning of knowledge. The sword, is the sword of knowledge that cuts the knots of ignorance and destroys false consciousness (the severed head). Kali opens the gates of freedom with this sword, having cut the eight bonds that bind human beings.

Kali’s lolling tongue and sharp fangs are interpreted as symbolizing the conquest of rajasic power (physical, sensory, red tongue) by sattvic power (spiritual, white teeth). That is, Kali is totally sattvic, totally spiritual in nature, having transcended all impurities.

Kali’s blackness symbolizes her all-embracing, comprehensive nature, because black is the color in which all other colors merge; black absorbs and dissolves them, symbolizing transcendence of all form.

Kali’s nudity has a similar meaning. It symbolizes that she is completely beyond name and form, completely beyond the illusory effects of maya (false consciousness), completely transcendent illuminated consciousness. Kali is the bright fire of truth, which cannot be hidden by the clothes of ignorance. Such truth simply burns them away.

Kali’s dwelling place, the cremation ground, has a similar meaning. The cremation ground denotes a place where the five elements are dissolved. Kali dwells where dissolution takes place. In terms of devotion, worship, and sadhana, this denotes the dissolving  of attachments, anger, lust, and other binding emotions, feelings, and ideas. The heart of the devotee  is where this burning takes place, and it is in the heart that Kali dwells. The devotee makes her image in his heart and under her influence burns away all limitations and ignorance in the cremation fires. This inner cremation fire in the heart is the fire of knowledge, which Kali bestows.

Kali’s seat, which is none other than the supine body of Siva (corpselike), symbolizes that her devotees have given up their entire lives for her, having offered her their very breath. Having sacrificed themselves ( their egos) to her, devotees die and become corpselike. It is only then that Kali enters their hearts, freeing them from all worldly cares. Kali’s standing on Siva signifies her blessing of her devotees.

The garland of severed heads represents the sounds of the alphabet (or the 50 sanskrit letters) and symbolizes Kali as the underlying essence of reality as manifest in sound, particularly  the primordial sound, om. From the various sound seeds, all creation proceeds, and Kali is identified with this underlying power. Her girdle of severed arms represents the destruction of devotee’s karma. The arms symbolize deeds, actions – karma – and the binding effects of this karma have been overcome, severed, by Kali devotion. She has blessed the devotee by cutting him free from karma.

Demanding ultimate knowledge, her worshipers seek to heroically and boldly confront the darkness, the shadow, eyes open, fearless.

 


References: Ten Mahavidias – Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine – Kinsley
Amazing Art Credit: George Redreev

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440 KWP – MahaKali, Rank One, Position One, Goatfish: aka Kali Ma, Durga, Ambika, Makara – assigned to bring down all religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism) and structures of patriarchal male-mind dominance. Demonstrates the use of morbido, male lust for killing.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 12-30-16 in the GOATFISH

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kurukulla-br

She is the quintessence of sweet eros,
Glorious with the beauty of infinite fiery brilliance,
With full breasts and buttocks,
Terrible with fangs flashing in the light
Shooting from her three rolling red eyes
Her broad tongue lashes its curling tip
She is as bright as all fires…

Kurukulla is a ‘Female Tathagata’, a primordial mother, a female Buddha. As such, she also figures as a meditational deity in the highest and most esoteric division of Tantric practices, the Highest Yoga Tantra class, whose goal is the attainment of Buddhahood in the present lifetime.

Because Kurukkula is a fully enlightened being, there is no limit to her mastery. She is also known as the Overpowering Goddess, Subjugator of the Three Realms, expressing her dominion over all that is below, on, and above the earth. At the most worldly end she holds sway over humans, spirit beings, gods, rulers, countries, food, clothing, wealth, and fame. She is often invoked to remove human and demonic obstacles to new ventures by traders, students, and hopeful lovers seeking success.

Kurukulla is a goddess with unlimited powers of enchantment. Her voluptuous body is bright, glowing red, the hue of passion and amorous desire. Glistening with ruby radiance, mistress of the art of seduction, Kurukulla displays the tools of her magical craft: the flowered bow and arrow with which she pierces the hearts of those she would enchant, the noose with which she binds them, and the elephant goad with which she hooks and draws them into her sphere of liberation.

Kurukulla’s weapon is adorned with red lotus blossoms that send forth swarms of fierce red bees. The targets of her magic do not feel suffering. They are intoxicated by the fragrance of the lotuses, mesmerized by the buzzing of the bees,  and bewildered by crimson clouds of rapture. Thus enraptured, they are susceptible to Kurukulla’s transcendent sorcery. A reluctant object of desire can become an ardent lover; a wealthy person can become a patron; an enemy can become a friend. Kurukulla’s magic has the power to soften the hardest heart, dissolve disharmony, and bestow the highest bliss.

 

The Magical Function of Enchantment

Kurukulla appears to have become popular originally, and she remains so even among the Tibetans today, because of her association with the magical function of enchantment or the bewitching of people in order to bring them under one’s power. More than any other figure in the Buddhist pantheon, Kurukulla becomes the Buddhist goddess of love and sex, corresponding to the Western goddesses Aphrodite and Venus. She is depicted as a voluptuous and seductive nude sixteen year old girl. At her crown is the syllable OM, at her throat is the syllable AH, and at her heart is the syllable HUM.

kurukulla-1The ornaments of human bone she wears signify the five perfections, whereas she herself embodies the sixth perfection, that of wisdom. She wears a necklace of fifty freshly severed human heads dripping blood because she vanquishes the fifty negative emotions. She is dancing because she is active and energetic, her compassionate activity manifesting in both Samsara and Nirvana. She dances, treading upon a male human corpse because she enchants and subjugates the demon of ego. She stands upon a red sun disc because her nature is hot and inflamed with passion and upon a red lotus blossom because she is a pure vision of enlightened awareness. The lotus is associated with female sexuality and symbolizes, among other things, the female genitalia.

The secret of Kurukullas power is that she wields the unconquerable, irresistible force of love. Her heart is a reservoir of this emotion in its most refined form. Her drawn arrow, poised in front of her heart, becomes saturated with her beauteous heart essence. To be pierced by her arrow is to be penetrated by her transcendent love and undergo a profound change of heart. Herein lies the power of the goddess to subdue, impassion, and incite to higher love and awareness.

There would appear to be a potential misuse of Kurukullas rites to harm others, but those who would invoke her in ritual and meditation cannot call on her services for selfish ends. Kurukulla is motivated by wisdom and compassion; her divine beauty reflects her transcendent purity. She will never grant a vision of herself or perform her magic for those who seek only to benefit themselves or inflict suffering on others. Kurukulla, like every Buddha, acts solely for the welfare, happiness, and liberation of all sentient beings.

 


References: Buddhist Goddesses of India – Miranda Shaw
The Passionate Lotus Dakini Kurukulla – John Myrdhin Reynolds

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440 KWP – Kurukulla, Rank One, Position Thirteen, Archer: aka Athena (the archer), Mad Marlena, Switch Bitch, Ceridwen (Celtic), motley crew, men and women in triads – assigned to breaking all taboos, guerrilla warfare on glamour and advertising, breaking through repressive cultural norms, attacking conformity, using pranks, ridicule, and satire to discredit cultural authorities.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 11-30-16 in the ARCHER

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Mahavidya-Kamala-br

She is resplendent like the rising sun and wears a bright moon disc on her brow. She is adorned with a crown and a necklace of jewels. She is bent down due to the weight of her large breasts, and in her hands she holds two lotuses and two bunches of rice shoots. She has three lotuslike eyes and has a smiling face.

The name Kamala means ‘she of the lotus’ and is a common epithet of the goddess Laksmi or Sri, who is said to be adorned by lotuses and to be lotus eyed and surrounded by lotuses. Indeed Kamala is none other than the goddess Laksmi. Of all the goddesses in the Mahavidya group, Kamala is the best known and most popular and has the oldest tradition of worship outside the Mahavidya context. She is a goddess with auspicious, benign, and desirable qualities. She identifies with worldly blessings found in ordinary religious practices: wealth, power, good luck, and safety.

Early references to Kamala call her Sri: auspicious, her positive qualities are identified with food, royal power, luster, fortune, and beauty. She gives wealth and other desired objects  to her devotees, is beautiful and adorned with costly ornaments, and is associated with fertility and growth.

kamala-5The lotus seems to have two general meanings. First, it is related to life and fertility – the yoni, female genitalia. On a cosmic scale, the lotus represents entire created order. The cosmos as lotuslike suggests a world that is organic, vigorous, and beautiful. It is the fecund vigor suggested by the lotus that is revealed in Sri. She is the life force that pervades creation.

Second, especially in relation to Sri, the lotus suggests spiritual purity, power, and authority. The lotus seat is a common theme in Hindu and Buddhist iconography. Gods, and goddesses, buddhas and bodhisattva’s, are typically shown seated or standing on a lotus. Like the lotus which is rooted in the mud but whose blossoms are uncontaminated by it, these spiritual beings are understood to transcend the earthly limitations of the world (mud of existence). Sri’s association with the lotus suggests that she symbolizes a certain perfection of state of refinement that transcends the material world, yet is rooted in it.

She has a beautiful golden complexion. She is being bathed by four large elephants who pour jars of nectar over her. In her four hands she holds two lotuses and makes the sign of granting boons and giving assurance. She wears a resplendent crown and a silken dress.

Sri’s association with the elephant suggests other aspects of her character that are ancient and persistent. One of the most common representations of Sri shows her flanked by two elephants that are showering her with water from their trunks. The elephants have two meanings. According to Hindu tradition, elephants are related to clouds and rain, and hence fertility. Second, elephants suggest royal authority. Kings kept stables of elephants, which they rode in processions and used in military campaigns. Kings were also held responsible  for bringing timely rains and for the fertility of the land.

mahavidya-kamala-10In appropriating the great and widely worshiped goddess Sri-Laksmi as a Mahavidya, the formulators of the Mahavidya tantric texts modified and tailored her character, it seems, to make her more suitable to the group. Indeed, her inclusion among the mahavidyas is not easily explained, and her place in Tantrism, the primary context of the Mahavidyas, seems somewhat out of character.

Kamala’s role among the Mahavidyas is a recent and minor part of her cult and worship in Hindu tradition. Unlike other Mahavidyas, such as Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, and Matangi, who are barely known outside the Mahavidya group, Laksmi is an ancient and extremely popular goddess, worshiped throughout India in a variety of contexts and sectarian movements.

In conclusion, it may be helpful to understand the contrasts of tantric religion and worship between that of Sri Lakshmi and Kali Ma. Lakshmi assists those who are seeking wealth and worldly comfort. Whereas Kali worshipers seek to heroically and boldly confront the darkness, demanding ultimate knowledge. Kali is described as a goddess with whom one must struggle, Lakshmi as one who pampers her devotees but ultimately is incapable of giving such supreme blessings as liberating knowledge.

In other words, Kamala represents a state of consciousness preoccupied with material well-being and security. That is, she represents the normal state of consciousness in almost all people and, as such, the starting point in the process of spiritual maturation. Kamala consciousness is what one seeks to restrain, overcome, and finally transcend.

Kali consciousness is the ultimate goal of liberation.

 


References: Ten Mahavidias – Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine – Kinsley

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440 KWP – Kamala, Rank Four, Position Ten, Scorpion: aka Lemanja, Kula Devi (Sri Kula), Kundalini Devi, Aphrodite, Astarte, Asteroth – assigned to Kala Tantra, erotic arts, sex education, porn-ed. Targets degenerate policies of sex education and gender equality.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 10-31-16 in the SCORPION

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idris_brushed

She has assumed a serious mood and is maddened with intoxication. Her brilliance reflects the golden hue of her body. On her forehead is the crescent moon, which is yellow in color.

Idris (bagalamukhi) is strongly associated with supernatural or magical powers, with the ability to immobilize and attract others. In one myth she is petitioned by the male gods to rescue the world from a power-crazed demon whose very words can kill and destroy. She stops the demons rampage by grasping his tongue, preventing him from further speech. She is almost always portrayed in this act. In this myth her power to paralyze is explicit and stressed. She is often said to give the power of paralyzing the movements and activities of enemies. She is also said to be the giver of vak siddhi – the power of superior speech – by which all opponents can be defeated. She has the power to freeze, stun, or paralyze.

She who is dressed in yellow. She is often said to like yellow, to be dressed in yellow, and to prefer yellow offerings like turmeric beads. Yellow is considered an auspicious color, symbolizing the sun and gold. The lust for money paralyzes people, and the sight of gold has the same effect. Turmeric is a golden colored spice, the main spice in curry, and is one of the most potent herbs on the planet in fighting and potentially reversing disease.

More than any of the other Mahavidyas, Idris is associated with magical powers, which are sometimes referred to as accomplishments or perfections. She who gives magical and mystical powers. She who’s form is the power to paralyze. She gives the ability to stupefy. She also gives the power of forceful intelligent speech by which one can defeat any opponent, no matter how brilliant.

Idris has the power to control the five breaths inside – By doing so, she controls the vital breath, she conquers the tongue, which means self-control over greed, speech, and taste. She has the power to grant wordly enjoyment and to grant wisdom, knowledge and liberation. She who is the bestower of ultimate liberation. She who gives wisdom. She also delights in granting ultimate enjoyment. Giver of wealth. And giver of pleasures and power.

In her ability to bestow the power of attracting others, she delights in sexual attraction. She who dwells where there is sexual desire, who likes sexual desire, who gives sexual desire, who’s eyes are full of desire. She who takes pleasure in sexual play. She who’s form is the yoni.

Modern Perspectives on Idris

“Idris secret power is to release the moral and emotional paralysis of blocks and obstacles. She who paralyzes can also de-paralyze. She has the power to switch obstacles in an instant, suddenly you are around it. She performs her switch exclusively with negative and blocking elements in your life that prevent you from attaining the best outcome of your desires.

There is no need to process the negative material, you do not have to learn anything from the blocks. The switch is abrupt, so suddenly that you cannot rationally work it out. At one moment you just realize that you don’t have to continue doing something that blocks you and holds you back. Her guidance is swift, silent, and impeccable.

Idris reverses our blocking attitudes so that we flow around, rather than smash into, whatever impedes us from truth and happiness. She represents and informs that aspect of the human psyche that liberates itself spontaneously from conflict and contradiction. The bridle of destiny holds us on course, keeping desire tightly coupled with all that is truly ours to love, learn, and enjoy.” JLL – source


References: Ten Mahavidias – Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine – Kinsley

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440 KWP – Idris, Rank Four, Position Eight, Twins: aka Bagalamuhki, Mistress of Fate, Moira, Demonia – assigned to arcane techniques of doubling, dreaming together, astral warfare, remote viewing attacks undertaken by couples. Targets marriage and all conventional forms of pair bonding. Champions self determination and romantic individuality for both genders. Attacks feminism.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 6-5-16 in the TWINS

swan-devi-sky-brushed

She is enlightened spontaneity in female form,
A supremely blissful divine yogini.
She is the mansion of enlightened awareness.
Possessor of the five Buddha-Wisdoms…
She is pure, universal awareness,
The sovereign of the mandala.
She is Nairatmya Yogini,
The essence of ultimate reality.

She is subtle and spacious and vast as the sky. Her body is blue, the color of infinite space, reflecting the limitless expanse of her awareness. Separation is an illusion, in truth we are connected with all that exists in a vast web of communion. Swan Devi (Nairatmya) embodies this realization. She is the lady of emptiness. She who has realized selflessness. Like the element of space, she flows through the universe without impediment, for she has transcended ego-centered existence.

swandeviHer eyes blaze with the wisdom of one who understands the mysteries and depths of life. She raises her curved knife skyward, poised to sever negative mindstates wherever they arise. In her skull bowl, she pulverizes illusions and returns them to their original state – a mere play of light, a rainbow of energy, shimmering in empty space. In a state of perpetual dance, she celebrates the bliss that pulses at the heart of reality. Her gleaming bone ornaments sway, glistening like cascading beads of light, illuminating the heavenly expanse of her body with shooting stars and swirling galaxies. To behold her is to long to join in her cosmic, eternal dance. (M.Shaw)

To contemplate Swan Devi, is to behold the essence of ultimate reality, the infinite expanse of all that exists. The essence of ultimate reality is emptiness and bliss.

She is deep blue in color, the indigo of midnight. She is draped with a skull necklace, bone ornaments, and a tiger skin skirt. Bearing a flaying knife, skull bowl, and tantric staff, she dances on an upward facing corpse on a moon disc. She has a fierce persona with furrowed brows, lolling eyes, bared incisors, lashing tongue, and upswept tawny hair. She transforms anger into mirrorlike clarity. The ferocity often attributed to female Buddhas also evinces the intensity of one who has faced and conquered all obstacles to enlightenment.

The flaying knife is for cutting off mental and emotional defilement’s, and the skull bowl is the realization of emptiness, which is beyond being and nonbeing. From her skull cup she drinks the blood of the four mara-demons, symbolizing the primary forms of attachment to self.

As a diamond sky dakini, she is identified with the mystical heat that is kindled in the navel chakra through inner yogic processes. She is known as the Burning One and described as ‘dwelling in the navel, source of supreme bliss, glorious, adorned with flames by virtue of her fiery heat.’ This inner yogic fire consumes delusion by rising upward along the spine, purifying the chakras of karmic residues of thought and emotion. Upon reaching the crown chakra, the heat causes the nectar of bliss in the crown of the head to melt and flow downward, generating increasing rapture and bliss, culminating in the supreme state of spontaneous joy when the nectar reaches and saturates the navel chakra.

This internal fire is a yogic version of the apocalyptic conflagration that destroys the world at the end of every cosmic cycle so that it may begin anew. In both cases fire is the consuming element, reducing all things to an undifferentiated state, returning them to their essence. This essence – the one thing remaining at worlds end, the irreducible quality of the world that is realized upon enlightenment is bliss – ‘Bliss is the single self-existent, perfect and eternal.’ She is bliss supreme.

Swan Devi translates into ‘purest form of knowledge (swan) from the goddess (devi)’. An apt name indeed, coined by John Lash. Only time will reveal the strength of a name. I for one, anticipate the inspired formation of the shakti cluster composition will stand this test of time. Swan Devi, a graceful compromise, should hold fast as a suitable name change replacing Nairatmya.


References: Buddhist Goddesses of India – Miranda Shaw

kalika-war-party-thunderbird-formation-2560x1440 KWP – Swan Devi, Rank Three, Position Eleven, Fishes: aka Swan Deva, Nairatmya, the Storykeeper – assigned to preserve and protect, guard and propagate the narrative of the Sophianic Mysteries, and related grand narratives (master plots) such as the Vajrayana Romance. Oversees cinematic projects that derive from Planetary Tantra. Targeting false and distracting narratives such as the Sitchen scenario, the slave species meme, off planet channelings, etc. Targets individual channelers.

Lunar Cycle: Last Crescent Moon Sighting: 3-31-17 in the Fishes
2-28-17 (1st of a double shift in 2017)

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